sea logo header 2SEA 15 Spring Header

The SEA is proud to be a member-driven organization, dedicated to the teaching and development of future anesthesiologists, and to the advancement of those who educate them.

British Journal of Anaesthesia - current issue

British Journal of Anaesthesia - RSS feed of current issue
  1. Non-invasive blood haemoglobin and plethysmographic variability index during brachial plexus block
    Background

    Plethysmographic measurement of haemoglobin concentration ($$\hbox{ SpHb }$$), pleth variability index (PVI), and perfusion index (PI) with the Radical-7 apparatus is growing in popularity. Previous studies have indicated that $$\hbox{ SpHb }$$ has poor precision, particularly when PI is low. We wanted to study the effects of a sympathetic block on these measurements.

    Methods

    Twenty patients underwent hand surgery under brachial plexus block with one Radical-7 applied to each arm. Measurements were taken up to 20 min after the block had been initiated. Venous blood samples were also drawn from the non-blocked arm.

    Results

    During the last 10 min of the study, $$\hbox{ SpHb }$$ had increased by 8.6%. The PVI decreased by 54%, and PI increased by 188% in the blocked arm (median values). All these changes were statistically significant. In the non-blocked arm, these parameters did not change significantly.

    Conclusions

    Brachial plexus block significantly altered $$\hbox{ SpHb }$$, PVI, and PI, which indicates that regional nervous control of the arm greatly affects plethysmographic measurements obtained by the Radical-7. After the brachial plexus block, $$\hbox{ SpHb }$$ increased and PVI decreased.

  2. Ultrasound and central venous catheterization: platelets and pennies
  3. Impact of isoflurane on malignant capability of ovarian cancer in vitro
    Background

    Metastatic recurrence of ovarian cancer is the foremost cause of postoperative mortality. With recent research indicating that inhalation of anaesthetics may influence cancer cell behaviour, this study investigated the effects of isoflurane on the expression of tumorigenic markers and proliferative capacity in ovarian cancer cells.

    Methods

    Ovarian cancer (SK-OV3) cells were cultured and then exposed to 2% isoflurane for 2 h. The expression of markers involved in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and migration were assessed up to 24 h after treatment using immunofluorescence staining, western blotting, and flow cytometry. The effects of isoflurane on in vitro angiogenesis and migration were also determined.

    Results

    Isoflurane exposure significantly increased insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and IGF-1R expression, cell cycle progression, and cell proliferation in SK-OV3 cells. Increased expression of the angiogenic markers vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by 56% (P<0.05) and angiopoietin-1 by 62% (P<0.05) was also observed 24 h after isoflurane exposure together with an enhanced in vitro angiogenesis. Cell migration was significantly increased after exposure to isoflurane together with increased production of both matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (both P<0.05) by almost five-fold relative to control. These effects were abolished when IGF-1R signalling was blocked either by neutralizing antibody or by small interfering RNA.

    Conclusions

    Our data indicate that isoflurane increases the malignant potential of ovarian cancer cells through the up-regulation of markers associated with the cell cycle, proliferation, and angiogenesis. This study warrants further investigations.

  4. Editorial Board
  5. Chestnut's Obstetric Anesthesia: Principles and Practice
  6. General Information
  7. Pacemakers with rate responsive functions and implications for anaesthetists
  8. Contents Page
  9. In reply
  10. In the May BJA ...
  11. Wrong-site nerve blocks: 10 yr experience in a large multihospital health-care system
    Introduction

    Although wrong-site surgery has garnered extensive scrutiny, the incidence of wrong-site blocks remains unknown. Our study thus sought to quantify the incidence of wrong-site blocks and examine some of their associated risk factors in our multihospital health-care system.

    Methods

    Using quality-improvement and billing data, we quantified the total number of blocks and wrong-site blocks occurring between July 1, 2002 and June 30, 2012 within the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System. The incidence of wrong-site block was determined by block type, hospital, and type of service involved in performing the block. The incidence of wrong-site block was compared with that of wrong-site surgery. Fisher's exact tests were performed to determine associations between the incidence of wrong-site block and any of the aforementioned variables. A root-cause analysis was performed to determine the source of wrong-site blocks after the implementation of a timeout policy.

    Results

    Of the 85 915 patients receiving blocks, 70 441 received only unilateral blocks, yielding an overall incidence of wrong-site block of 1.28 (95% confidence interval 0.43–2.13) per 10 000 patients receiving unilateral blocks. The incidence of wrong-site block was highest with femoral blocks, and differed from the incidence of wrong-site surgery. All occurrences of wrong-site block after the implementation of the timeout policy involved policy violations.

    Conclusions

    Our study provides the first incidence data on wrong-site block in a large patient population and can help hospitals to develop policies based on these data. It is yet to be determined whether active intervention can eliminate this adverse event.

  12. Time to dial down the vaporizer?
  13. Flawed assumptions about clinical trials
  14. Perioperative fluid management: science, art or random chaos?
  15. Painful to describe, painful to diagnose: opioid-induced hyperalgesia